The Power Of Adding Poetry To A Speech

by drjim on October 23, 2018

Poetry is music written for the human voice

Poetry is music written for the human voice
Image Credit: Hilary Dotson

How did your last speech go? Did your audience hang on your every word? Did they seem eager to hear what you were going to tell them next? Did they seem to be a bit disappointed when your speech was over – they really wanted you to keep on talking? If you are like most of us, the answer to most of these questions, despite the importance of public speaking, is “no”. What this means is that as public speakers we are dropping the ball. We really need to find a way to add some more zip to our next speech. Perhaps this is where poetry can step in and lend us a helping hand.

What Poetry Can Do For A Speech

All too often when we are creating the opening for a speech, we think about what we want to say to our audience and then we just say it. That’s ok as far as communication goes, but the bigger question is will it stick – are they going to remember what we’ve told them? In most cases, the answer is no. What this means is that perhaps the opening of our next speech would be the place to slide in a bit of Shakespeare or some other poet in order to find the words that will fire up the imagination of our audience.

We are all facing the same problem these days. The words that are easy to use, the ones that we find ourselves going to over and over again have become tired and worn out. There are a whole host of words that I can run by you that should cause you to start to groan: paradigm shift, low-hanging fruit, out of pocket, etc. All of these tired phrases are used by us in order to try to sound smart to our audience; however, more often than not they just end up trying to figure out what we are really trying to tell them. Likewise, we’ve all had to sit through countless PowerPoint presentations in which the presenter tried to impress us by turning nouns into verbs by adding “-ize” to the end (“incentivize” anyone?) Look, some jargon can help professionals communicate better. However, it all falls apart when we become either too technical or too wordy. You need to try to keep it nice and simple.

So this all puts you into a difficult position. You want to capture and hold onto your audience’s attention. However, most of the tools that you would generally use to do this appear to be overused and worn out. What’s a speaker to do? If we take a moment to listen to what the famous living poet Maya Angelou said: “Poetry is music written for the human voice” then we’ll know what we should do – work more poetry into our next speech. The good news about poetry is that it is supposed to be spoken and heard. Work some poetry into your next speech and you will have worked some music into the speech.

How To Work Poetry Into Your Next Speech

Before you are going to be able to work any poetry into your next speech, you are first going to have to find a way to get yourself inspired. One way to make this happen is to take the time to read poetry. When you read poetry you can read it in your mind, or even better read it out loud. Doing this can help to allow you to understand how you can say something in a way that will cause it to “stick” with your audience. If you don’t feel comfortable reading poetry, then take the time to read song lyrics. It turns out that these are poetry also!

In order to make sure that your audience remembers what you say, you need to find a way to engage all of their senses when they are listening to you. When people are creating poetry, they attempt to do more than just paint a picture with words. They try to make what they are talking about real using the five senses: taste, touch, smell, and sound as well as sight. As a speaker, one of the things that you need to realize is that the sense of smell is closely associated with our memory. This means that if you can find a way to work a description of either a scent or a taste into your speech, there is a better chance that people will remember what you told them.

One of the things that we need to be able to realize is that there is a flow to poetry. What this translates into is the understanding of the sound, pace and rhythm of the words that we use when we are reciting poetry. If you take the time to read some poetry out loud, you’ll discover that you are able to hear the cadence of the words. Poetry gives us words that seem to fit together and which flow naturally from each other. Your audience will be able to hear the fluidity in your speech when you use poetry.

What All Of This Means For You

The goal of any speech that we give is to be able to connect with our audience and make a change in their lives somehow by sharing with them the benefits of public speaking. The challenge that we run into is that it can be difficult to find a way to create a speech that allows us to present our thoughts and ideas in a way that will capture the imagination of our audience. All we have to work with are words and sometimes it can be difficult to see how we can use them to accomplish what we are trying to do. This is when poetry can come to our rescue.

A big challenge that we are all facing when we start to put a speech together is that a lot of the words and phrases that we automatically tend to use have been overused. They are now tired and will not capture our audience’s attention. If we can understand that poetry is a form of musical speech, then all of sudden we have a new tool with which to get the attention that we are looking for. In order to work poetry into your speech, you are going to have to first take the time to read poetry. Reading poetry out loud will allow you to start to understand how all of the words fit together. Taking the time to make sure that the poetry that you use will engage all of the senses is a great way to capture your audience’s interests. Finally, you need to be able to recognize the flow of the words in poetry. The cadence of the poem will make your speech more memorable for your audience.

Poetry is a powerful tool that not enough speakers are willing to incorporate into their speeches. We need to take the time to expose ourselves to more poetry so that we can start to understand how poetry fits words together and what the meaning of those words is. Once we become comfortable working poetry into our speeches, we can start to use the power of those words to attract and hold on to our audience’s attention.

– Dr. Jim Anderson
Blue Elephant Consulting –
Your Source For Real World Public Speaking Skills™

Question For You:

Click here to get automatic updates when The Accidental Communicator Blog is updated.
P.S.: Free subscriptions to The Accidental Communicator Newsletter are now available. Subscribe now: Click Here!
 
Note: What we talked about are advanced speaking skills. If you are just starting out I highly recommend joining Toastmasters in order to get the benefits of public speaking. Look for a Toastmasters club to join in your home town by visiting the web site www.Toastmasters.org. Toastmasters is dedicated to helping their members to understand the importance of public speaking by developing listening skills and getting presentation tips. Toastmasters is how I got started speaking and it can help you also!

What We’ll Be Talking About Next Time

So when you sit down to put a speech together, what language do you use? I’m not talking about English vs Spanish vs French here. Rather, I’m talking about the use of slang. You know what I’m talking about, slang is a type of language that consists of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal. Do you feel comfortable including this type of language in a speech? Do you think that it could contribute to the importance of public speaking? Should you be including more of it?

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Problems With Modern Speeches

by drjim on October 16, 2018

Perhaps we've become too good at this speaking thing

Perhaps we’ve become too good at this speaking thing
Image Credit: mike krzeszak

When we talk about giving speeches, we spend a lot of our time talking about how we can become better because we understand the importance of public speaking. We look at things like body language, what words we use, and how we go about building the speeches that we give. However, one thing that we never take the time to talk about is what happens if we become too good at giving speeches. In fact, is that even possible? Can we become so good at public speaking that all of a sudden our audiences no longer pay attention to us? If so, then what can we do to prevent this from happening?

That Darn Twitter Thing

When we give a speech, we want to make an impression on our audience. We want them to listen to what we say, be influenced by it, and then take action based on our words. However, it has always been quite difficult for a speaker to evaluate just how much of an impact their speech has had on their audience. However, now that we are all living in the internet age, this has become much easier. The arrival of Twitter and its ability to group together related “tweets” that all use the same hashtag (“#freedoughnutfriday”) has changed everything.

Now our audience has the chance to comment on our speech using Twitter. In fact, they can comment on it even as we are delivering the speech. Their comments have to be brief – 140 characters or less, but they can be current and topical. As more and more speakers have become aware of the power that Twitter has to spread our message, some of us have started to change how we create a speech. Some speakers are now making sure that their speeches contain content that is tweetable – has been designed to be sent out by audience members via the Twitter app.

Many people don’t think highly of this kind of speech construction. They think that speeches should be created for the audience, not for the world of Twitter. However, the critics may be over reacting. Lately a number of speeches have been analyzed for their tweetability. It turns out that speeches that were given by U.S. President Barack Obama, Malcom X, and Dr. Martin Luther King were all shown to be highly tweetable. This means that that a very good speech can also be a tweetable speech.

The Problem With Too Much Polish

When you are asked to give a speech, what do you do? If you are like most of us, you’ll sit down and take the time to create a speech. You’ll identify the points that you want to make, determine what facts you’ll want to use to back up your positions, and then you’ll decide how you want to wrap things up. Once you’ve done all of this, it will be time for you to practice your speech. You’ll practice it over and over again until you feel that you’ve gotten it down and that you’ll do a good job of delivering it. Once you reach this point, it’s time for you to go off and give your speech.

This is when you can start to run into problems. All of that practice that you put into creating your speech may have made you too good. What has happened is that you have smoothed out all of your rough edges. What is now going to happen is that you are not going to be able to make a real connection with your audience. When talking about difficult topics, your audience may decide that you don’t sound sufficiently sad, outraged, or even shocked. This can cause your audience to become skeptical about what you are saying.

I ran into this problem recently. After I had finished giving a speech a friend of mine was providing me with feedback on how I had done. He told me that mechanically I had been perfect: good eye contact, good hand gestures, and a loud clear voice. However, he said that I had not connected with my audience. The reason for this was because I had sounded “too good”. I had not had to search for any of my words, I had not stumbled, I had not used the wrong word in any part of the speech. In short, I had been like a perfect robot. This meant that nobody could connect with me and my message was not well received.

What All Of This Means For You

We live in a wonderful age in which public speakers have become much better than they ever were before. We have the opportunity to create, practice and deliver speeches that show off the benefits of public speaking and which are well polished machines. However, what we are discovering is that we may have become too good at what we do and by doing this, we may be losing our audience.

The ability to influence an audience and to get them to take action based on what we’ve told them has been the goal of public speakers for a long time. However, we’ve never really been able to tell if our words have had an impact on our audience. The arrival of the popular Twitter application has now provided our audiences with the ability to comment on our speeches and spread our message in real time. In order to help our audience do this, some speakers are creating speeches that are designed to contain messages that can be tweeted. However, studies have shown that very good speeches in the past were just naturally tweetable and didn’t have to be designed this way. Another problem that speakers are running into is that they have become too good. By smoothing out all of the rough spots in their speech they have created a masterpiece that will no longer allow them to connect with their audiences.

As speakers we are obligated to take advantage of all of the advances that become available to us. The arrival of Twitter and our ability to do a better job of practicing speeches that we’ll be giving are examples of this. The good news is that we don’t have to structure our speeches to fit Twitter’s 140 character limitations and we can still get a good response from our audience. We just need to make sure that we don’t over practice our speeches and drive all of the humanity out of them. We can give excellent speeches, we just need to make sure that we are meeting the needs of our audience.

– Dr. Jim Anderson
Blue Elephant Consulting –
Your Source For Real World Public Speaking Skills™

Question For You: If you don’t want to over practice your speech, then how many times should you practice it?

Click here to get automatic updates when The Accidental Communicator Blog is updated.
P.S.: Free subscriptions to The Accidental Communicator Newsletter are now available. Subscribe now: Click Here!
 
Note: What we talked about are advanced speaking skills. If you are just starting out I highly recommend joining Toastmasters in order to get the benefits of public speaking. Look for a Toastmasters club to join in your home town by visiting the web site www.Toastmasters.org. Toastmasters is dedicated to helping their members to understand the importance of public speaking by developing listening skills and getting presentation tips. Toastmasters is how I got started speaking and it can help you also!

What We’ll Be Talking About Next Time

How did your last speech go? Did your audience hang on your every word? Did they seem eager to hear what you were going to tell them next? Did they seem to be a bit disappointed when your speech was over – they really wanted you to keep on talking? If you are like most of us, the answer to most of these questions, despite the importance of public speaking, is “no”. What this means is that as public speakers we are dropping the ball. We really need to find a way to add some more zip to our next speech. Perhaps this is where poetry can step in and lend us a helping hand.

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