3 Things That Every Speech MUST Have

by drjim on June 27, 2017

When building a speech, these are three things that you must include

When building a speech, these are three things that you must include
Image Credit: Andy Griffiths

Nobody ever said that building a speech was going to be easy, but sometimes it seems to be harder to do than other times. It is at times like this that we need to be able to take a step back and make sure that we really understand what we need to be including in our speech in order to deliver on the importance of public speaking. It turns out that every speech must contain three critical items. If we don’t include them, then our next speech is just going to fall flat on its face.

Main Points

When we are creating a speech, the main points that we include in our speech are what is going to end up making up the bulk of our speech. At the start of your speech you should have already hinted at what your speech is going to be about. Once you hit the section that will contain your main points, this is where you’ll be filling in the details. You are going to want to order your main points in the same order that you hinted at what you were going to be covering. Doing this will meet the expectations that you set with your audience.

The way that you are going to want to handle your main points is to start things off by stating the main point. Then you are going to want to swing back and do some filling in. You can fill in using reasons, example, stories, and details that support the main point that you have just made. This might also be a good place to share a statistic with your audience that will support your position. The details that you offer will help to make the speech that you are giving both unique and suitable for the occasion that you are giving it at.

Introduction

One mistake that a lot of speakers who are just starting out make when they sit down to write a speech is that the first thing that they do is to write out the introduction to their speech. The reason that this is a mistake is because at this point they really don’t have a good grasp of what’s going to be in their speech. A much better approach is to put off writing the introduction until after the main points and their supporting material have all been laid out. Doing this ensures that you’ll be able to create an introduction that will lead into what you want to say in your main points.

Every introduction has the same set of goals. The first is that you are going to want to write it in a way that will allow you to grab your audience’s attention. The next is that you are going to want to set a tone for your speech. Will it be somber, humorous, serious, or have a note of urgency to it? Your introduction will need to establish your credibility with your audience. Why should they believe what you are going to be telling them next? Finally, as you wrap up your introduction you are going to want to lead into your main point section.

Conclusion

The conclusion to your speech needs to be very obvious. You want your audience to know that you are preparing to wrap up your speech. By doing this you’ll cause them to sit up and pay closer attention because they know that the speech is getting ready to come to an end. In your conclusion you are going to want to provide your audience with whatever they have been searching for by listing to your speech. This can a solution to a problem, an answer to a question, or an explanation of something that they had not understood before.

The good news for you is that you should write your conclusion once you have both the main points and the introduction already written. You really do want to have a good understanding of what you’ll be covering in your speech before you try to wrap things up. In your conclusion you’ll want to once again touch on the main points that you’ve made. Finally, you are going to want to loop back to what you talked with your audience about in your introduction. By doing this you’ll have provided them with “bookends” for your speech and they’ll be left with a sense of real satisfaction when your speech is over.

What All Of This Means For You

As speakers, our next speech is only going to be as good as we can write it. When we sit down to create a speech we need to understand that there are some fundamental parts that we need to include in every speech that we make in order to deliver the benefits of public speaking. These parts include main points, an introduction, and a conclusion.

The main points that we include in our speech have to have already been hinted at earlier in our speech. We need to lay them out in the same sequence that we hinted at them. We then need to provide additional details to support each of the points that we make. Our introduction should be written after we get done writing our main points. This allows us to make sure that we have a good understanding of what we want to cover in our speech. The introduction should always lead into our main points. The last part of the speech that we write is the conclusion. This part needs to touch on our main points and then loop back to the material that we covered in our introduction.

Writing a good speech is not an easy thing to do. However, if we understand the parts that we need to include in every speech that we write, then all of sudden things start to become just a bit easier. The next time that you are writing a speech, take the time to lay out your main points, create an introduction and then create a conclusion. You’ll be amazed at how much simpler the whole process becomes!

– Dr. Jim Anderson
Blue Elephant Consulting –
Your Source For Real World Public Speaking Skills™

Question For You: How many main points do you think that a speech should have?

Click here to get automatic updates when The Accidental Communicator Blog is updated.
P.S.: Free subscriptions to The Accidental Communicator Newsletter are now available. Subscribe now: Click Here!
 
Note: What we talked about are advanced speaking skills. If you are just starting out I highly recommend joining Toastmasters in order to get the benefits of public speaking. Look for a Toastmasters club to join in your home town by visiting the web site www.Toastmasters.org. Toastmasters is dedicated to helping their members to understand the importance of public speaking by developing listening skills and getting presentation tips. Toastmasters is how I got started speaking and it can help you also!

What We’ll Be Talking About Next Time

Nobody ever said that building a speech was going to be easy, but sometimes it seems to be harder to do than other times. It is at times like this that we need to be able to take a step back and make sure that we really understand what we need to be including in our speech in order to deliver on the importance of public speaking. It turns out that every speech must contain three critical items. If we don’t include them, then our next speech is just going to fall flat on its face.

Creating, practicing, and delivering a speech is not an easy thing to do. However, as long as we are going to the effort of doing such a thing there has to be a reason. There has to be some sort of motivation greater than the importance of public speaking for us to make the effort, conquer our fears, and stand in front of that audience. It turns out that there is such a motivation. More often than not we are telling our audience about an idea that is very important to us. What we want them to do is to listen, understand, and then spread our idea. What can we do during our speech to boost the chances of this spreading occurring?

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If you are going to create a speech, it had better have both of these

If you are going to create a speech, it had better have both of these
Image Credit: Nick Harris

If you were going to build a person, just exactly how would you go about doing it? You’d probably start with a head, add some arms, a rib cage, some hips, some legs and toss in a couple of feet and you’d pretty much be there. When we are writing a speech, since we understand the importance of public speaking, we do a lot of the same things. No matter what we will be talking about, we all understand that every speech needs to have some similar parts in order to make it all connect together. Like a head and some arms. Your speech is going to look pretty silly if you don’t include these!

Every Speech Needs A Goal

Many of the beginning speakers that I work with are resistant to taking the time to identify what the goal of their next speech is. Won’t the audience “just get it” from what they have to say? One of the key reasons that I get so much push-back on this critical step is because you will never state your goal in your speech – it’s not explicitly part of the speech. Instead, once you’ve identified the goal of your speech you will use it to guide everything else that you do in order to create a meaningful and clear message to share with your audience.

When you are creating a speech and are searching to find out what your goal needs to be, you need to keep in mind that every goal has four parts to it. The first is that you should be able to express it in one complete sentence. The next is that it should be specific – not general. There should only be one idea associated with your goal. Finally, when you state your goal it should contain powerful language that will motivate your audience.

As you create your goal, you are going to want to make sure that it focuses on the message that you want to deliver to your audience. The goal that you create can use a specific number (“3 keys to…”) to manage the length of your speech. The single idea expressed in your goal will allow you to trim away all of the extra things that you could cover, but which would take away from your primary message.

Every Speech Needs A “Power Statement”

When I’m teaching speakers how to become better, more often than not they will ask me “what is a power statement?” It turns out that a power statement is a single statement that is part of your speech. This statement previews what you are going to be telling your audience. It is fair to say that the power statement is probably the single most important statement in your speech.

Your power statement comes directly from the goal that you selected for your speech. By taking the time to succinctly outline what you are going to be telling them in your speech, you are providing your audience with an opportunity to better manage what you are going to be telling them. Power statements don’t just show up by themselves. Instead, you are going to have to get creative and spend some time brainstorming in order to come up with a power statement that will work for your speech. Your power statement should be a single statement that touches on three or four things that you want to say about a given topic.

A power statement should not be lengthy. Instead, it should be concise. What you are trying to do here is to share the main headings of what you will be covering in your speech with your audience. You want to let them know what will be coming in your speech. It’s very important that you understand that your speech goal and your power statement are both dependent on each other. By creating a power statement, you will have established the main points for your speech.

What All Of This Means For You

Every speech that we create will have a structure to it. The content of each speech will, of course, be different, but the structure of each speech will be very similar so that we can share the benefits of public speaking with our audience. As speakers we need to make sure that we know how to create the key parts that will be in each speech including the goal and the power statement.

Many speakers resist creating a goal because you’ll never actually use it in your speech. Instead, you’ll use it to guide the creation of the rest of the speech. Each goal will have four specific parts to it. You need to make sure that your goal focuses on the message that you want to deliver to your audience. The power statement that you will include in your speech clearly covers what you’ll be going over during your speech. You are sharing what your speech will be touching on with your audience before you get to it. The power statement is based on your speech’s goal. Keep it short and allow your power statement to help you define how the rest of your speech is going to be laid out.

Once you’ve created the goal and the power statement for your next speech, the hard work is now done. There will be more work to accomplish, but by using your goal and your power statement you now have an outline that will control what else you’ll put into your speech. Using an effective goal and power statement will allow you to deliver a speech that your audience will never forget.

– Dr. Jim Anderson
Blue Elephant Consulting –
Your Source For Real World Public Speaking Skills™

Question For You: Do you think that there would ever be a situation where you would include your goal statementn your speech?

Click here to get automatic updates when The Accidental Communicator Blog is updated.
P.S.: Free subscriptions to The Accidental Communicator Newsletter are now available. Subscribe now: Click Here!
 
Note: What we talked about are advanced speaking skills. If you are just starting out I highly recommend joining Toastmasters in order to get the benefits of public speaking. Look for a Toastmasters club to join in your home town by visiting the web site www.Toastmasters.org. Toastmasters is dedicated to helping their members to understand the importance of public speaking by developing listening skills and getting presentation tips. Toastmasters is how I got started speaking and it can help you also!

What We’ll Be Talking About Next Time

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